Elizabeth Hollenbeck (1827-1918)

Elizabeth Hatsfeldt, the youngest of three children (one son and two daughters) was born on December 17, 1827 at Mainz, Germany. Her parents later moved to the United States and settled in New Orleans, where Elizabeth was educated. At age sixteen or seventeen, she married a much older man named Eagles, who had two grown daughters about Elizabeth’s age. Eagles was a successful teaming contractor, but died in the course of his work, leaving his young widow an estate of $15,000. Elizabeth had another short marriage to a man named Walter, who proved to be a gambler and who died
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Boyle Heights History Blog

Started in 2009, the Boyle Heights History Blog provides posts on many aspects of the neighborhood’s rich and dynamic history, including notable people, places and events, from the Lopez family which settled in what was called Paredon Blanco in the 1830s; to the 1875 founding of Boyle Heights by William H. Workman, Isaias W. Hellman and John Lazzarovitch; and to the change in the community from an upper middle class suburb to a working-class multi-ethnic neighborhood. The URL for the Boyle Heights History Blog is: http://boyleheightshistoryblog.blogspot.com.
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A Story from Olivia Dueñas

Memories of my School Days at Bridge Street School in Boyle Heights I recall being in Kindergarten at Bridge Street School, playing in the sandbox and on the swings, and learning to read from the Dick and Jane book, “See Spot Run.” My teacher’s name was Mrs. Gulag, who by the way, years later, became my own daughter’s kindergarten teacher when she too attended Bridge St. Then my life changed when we moved to a house on Bunker Hill, near Boston and Figueroa. My sister and I attended Alpine Elementary School. Little did I know that in the 3rd grade,
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A Story from Audrey Mcnab

A Story from Audrey Mcnab My family came to East Los Angeles in 1944 from Arkansas. We lived at 115 S. Concord (between Fresno and Lorena Sts) and my sister and I went to First St. School, then to Stevenson Jr. Hi and Garfield Hi school. A trek to Evergreen plunge was almost a daily occurrence during the summer and every two weeks (when the books were due) meant a walk to the Robert Louis Stevenson Library. The Ben Franklin Library was too intimidating. Sears on Olympic was THE PLACE to shop. Wyernwood was private, upscale apartment living and Estrada
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